What is Psychotherapy? (3)

 

Psychotherapy is a form of talking therapy. It teaches people new ways and strategies to deal with difficult thoughts, feelings and behaviors. Psychotherapy aims to help clients to live life to their full potential. It's goal is often to help clients to find more effective ways to manage feelings, memories or situations they find emotionally challenging.

 

Psychotherapy maybe useful by itself and in some cases it is combined with medications. Your therapist and you will discuss this with the individual as it depends on many factors including the client's perspective. The therapist and client will create a treatment plan that reflects what and how the treatment targets.

 

There are different types of psychotherapy. What are some of them? 

Different types of therapy suit different type of people and issues. "No size fits all." Many therapists on this site are trained in a variety of modalities. Depending on the treatment plan one or sometimes a combination of therapies will be most suitable to fit the client's needs.

 

Below you will find some brief descriptions of some of the main psychotherapies. They are by no means complete explanations but will outline some of their basic elements.

 

Psychodynamic Therapy

Dialectical Behavior Therapy

Psychodrama

EMDR

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Mentalization Based Therapy

 

 

Psychodynamic therapy

Historically, psychodynamic therapy was tied to the principles of psychoanalytic theory, which asserts that a person's behavior is affected by his or her unconscious mind and past experiences. Now therapists who use psychodynamic therapy rarely include psychoanalytic methods. Rather, psychodynamic therapy helps people gain greater self-awareness and understanding about their own actions. It helps patients identify and explore how their nonconscious emotions and motivations can influence their behavior. Sometimes ideas from psychodynamic therapy are interwoven with other types of therapy, to treat various types of mental disorders.  (1)

 

 

Dialectical Behavior Therapy

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), a form of CBT, was developed by Marsha Linehan, Ph.D. At first, it was developed to treat people with suicidal thoughts and actions. It is now also used to treat people with borderline personality disorder (BPD). BPD is an illness in which suicidal thinking and actions are more common.

The term "dialectical" refers to a philosophic exercise in which two opposing views are discussed until a logical blending or balance of the two extremes—the middle way—is found. In keeping with that philosophy, the therapist assures the patient that the patient's behavior and feelings are valid and understandable. At the same time, the therapist coaches the patient to understand that it is his or her personal responsibility to change unhealthy or disruptive behavior.

DBT emphasizes the value of a strong and equal relationship between patient and therapist. The therapist consistently reminds the patient when his or her behavior is unhealthy or disruptive—when boundaries are overstepped—and then teaches the skills needed to better deal with future similar situations. DBT involves both individual and group therapy. Individual sessions are used to teach new skills, while group sessions provide the opportunity to practice these skills.

Research suggests that DBT is an effective treatment for people with BPD. A recent NIMH-funded study found that DBT reduced suicide attempts by half compared to other types of treatment for patients with BPD.

 

 

Psychodrama

Psychodrama...

 

 

EMDR

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing) therapy is an eight-phase treatment. Eye movements (or other bilateral stimulation) are used during one part of the session. After the clinician has determined which memory to target first, he asks the client to hold different aspects of that event or thought in mind and to use his eyes to track the therapist's hand as it moves back and forth across the client's field of vision. As this happens, for reasons believed by a Harvard researcher to be connected with the biological mechanisms involved in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, internal associations arise and the clients begin to process the memory and disturbing feelings. In successful EMDR therapy, the meaning of painful events is transformed on an emotional level. For instance, a rape victim shifts from feeling horror and self-disgust to holding the firm belief that, "I survived it and I am strong." Unlike talk therapy, the insights clients gain in EMDR result not so much from clinician interpretation, but from the client’s own accelerated intellectual and emotional processes. The net effect is that clients conclude EMDR therapy feeling empowered by the very experiences that once debased them. Their wounds have not just closed, they have transformed. As a natural outcome of the EMDR therapeutic process, the clients’ thoughts, feelings and behavior are all robust indicators of emotional health and resolution—all without speaking in detail or doing homework used in other therapies. (2) (see also definition of EMDR)

 

 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a blend of two therapies: cognitive therapy (CT) and behavioral therapy. CT was developed by psychotherapist Aaron Beck, M.D., in the 1960's. CT focuses on a person's thoughts and beliefs, and how they influence a person's mood and actions, and aims to change a person's thinking to be more adaptive and healthy. Behavioral therapy focuses on a person's actions and aims to change unhealthy behavior patterns.

CBT helps a person focus on his or her current problems and how to solve them. Both patient and therapist need to be actively involved in this process. The therapist helps the patient learn how to identify distorted or unhelpful thinking patterns, recognize and change inaccurate beliefs, relate to others in more positive ways, and change behaviors accordingly.

CBT can be applied and adapted to treat many specific mental disorders. (3)

 

 

Mentalization Based Therapy MBT

Mentalization ...

 

1.(Leichsenring F, Leibing E. Psychodynamic psychotherapy: a systematic review of techniques, indications and empirical evidence. Psychology and Psychotherapy. 2007 Jun; 80(Pt 2): 217-228).

2. see more here: http://www.emdr.com/general-information/what-is-emdr/what-is-emdr.html

3. see more here: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/psychotherapies/index.shtml

 
 
 
 
 
 

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